On the iPad, don’t try to fix scrolling

I have to admit that this really bothers me. Yesterday, I decided to write a little tool to let my boss create his presentations on an iPad by sorting a set of pre-created images. Nothing fancy, but I needed two separately scrolling viewports that are NOT operated with the two-finger-dragging-gesture. Seemed pretty straight forward. Make the elements in the last-touched element position:absolute, so that they scroll with the document, while keeping the rest position:fixed so that they stay were they are. Tried it on various browsers on both Android and Windows and it’s so braid-dead simple that even IE can cope.

The thing that I was worried about was that the iPad would smooth-scroll to the new scroll position that’s needed when you return to a previously-scrolled element (you can’t just move the element to the correct position, because that would usually be negative and that means that you wouldn’t be able to scroll to the left-most parts of the element). Turns out that part worked, but everything else fell to pieces. Switching between fixed and absolute a couple of times with big elements almost always crashes Safari straight away. Plus, after switching a couple of times, the iPad would usually get confused and move the scrollable area to some arbitrary rectangle.

I’m sorry, but I really don’t know how to say this nicely: Apple, get your act together. The iOS browser was great when it came out, but having to worry about scrolling feels like the nineties all over again.

This entry was written by Hans Schmucker , posted on Monday February 11 2013at 09:02 am , filed under Default Category . Bookmark the permalink . Post a comment below or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

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